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Guardianship

Thursday, June 22, 2017

How Safe is My Mother from Financial Exploitation?


 

Jennifer’s 80-year-old mother seemed to be running low on funds every month.  By the end of the month, she had no money for groceries.  Jennifer had helped her mother with a budget, so she thought her mother had plenty of money to make it through each month.  When she asked her mother to allow her to look at her bank statements, though, Jennifer discovered a series of automatic debits to several companies she did not recognize.  It turns out, her mother had signed up for monthly book delivery clubs, as well as recurring magazine subscriptions for magazines Jennifer knew her mother did not read.
Read more . . .


Thursday, June 1, 2017

Important Things You Should Know Before Deciding to Seek Guardianship or Conservatorship of an Adult


What exactly is a guardian, what is a conservator and when should you become the guardian or conservator of an adult?

Aunt Mary is 86 years old and has always been a little eccentric, but lately she’s been giving money to John, a much younger man that she calls her special friend.  Aunt Mary says that she knows her family doesn’t approve of her giving him money and gifts, but she has plenty of money, John has been her friend for many years, he has always helped her with her home and yard, and she doesn’t have anyone else she would rather spend her money on.  Does she need a guardian or conservator?

What is a guardian and conservator?

A guardian is a person who is legally responsible for someone who is not able to manage his or her own affairs. Guardians and conservators are appointed by the judge of the probate court in the county in which the person in need of a guardian/conservator, called a ward, resides or can be found.

In Georgia, a guardian is the term that is used for the person responsible for managing affairs related to the health and safety of the ward, while a conservator is responsible for the financial affairs of the ward.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

March is Social Work Month!

Featured Article by Thom Corrigan, MSW, CMC

Each March we are asked to celebrate Social Work month. For some, this means sending a note or an e-mail to a social worker we may know. For others, it may be treating a social work colleague to lunch or bringing them a plant or some flowers to show our appreciation for them.

But this year, I invite you all to celebrate what social workers do, in addition to who they are. Social workers possess many traits and skills. These include being trained to serve as advocates and brokers for our clients. Social workers have developed skills in the areas of empowerment, resourcefulness, problem solving and helping people with transition. They help people to learn new skills while at the same time, helping them to regain confidence, self-esteem, self-determination and resilience. Social workers do this in part by modeling, teaching, empowering, counseling and developing in a person the traits and characteristics that will lead to better outcomes and create a heightened sense of accomplishment and independence.

Each year, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) creates a theme as part of its celebration for social work. This year's theme is "Weaving Threads of Resilience and Advocacy: The Power of Social Work."   Lastly, did you know that Social Work is the only profession that has the word "WORK" in its name? I find that interesting-

Happy Social Work Month to all my professional peers and colleagues and thanks for all that you do to help people with their everyday needs and challenges!

Thom Corrigan, MSW, CMC
Certified Care Manager


Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Caregiver Appreciation

Expressing appreciation for the assistance received from caregivers is something that not many think about, but is certainly needed. Now some may say, “Why should I be grateful for help from someone I am paying?” Or in the case of family caregivers, “Aren’t family members supposed to take care of each other?” Research shows, however, that not only does expressing appreciation make the caregiver feel better about what they do, but also that the people expressing gratitude have a greater sense of well-being.

Expressing appreciation for something your caregiver has done for you does not require the eloquence of a public speaker, only a few words are all that it takes. Examples of some things to say thank you for are : “Your gentleness when helping me change positions really minimizes my pain. Thank you.” “The way you talk to me as a person, rather than a patient, really makes me feel good.”  By giving sincere words of affirmation  will not only allow the caregiver to feel appreciated, but will help them to have a know how you liked to be cared for.

Expressing gratitude is a choice. This month, show some appreciation to someone who helps care for those in need.


Monday, February 18, 2013

Is it possible to establish a Trust for your Pet?

Laws on the subject of pet trusts vary from state to state.  Since animals are not allowed to be beneficiaries of a trust, various legislative devices have been employed in the past.  Some states authorized the creation of “honorary trusts” which could be used to provide for the care of a pet, but were not enforceable by a court.  The Uniform Probate Code recognized “pet trusts” in 1990, and the Uniform Trust Code added a pet trust provision in 2000.  However, the Uniform Codes are only recommendations, and each state chooses whether or not to adopt any of their provisions.  As of the end of 2009, 42 states and the District of Columbia have adopted some type of provision which allows creation of a pet trust, some based on the Uniform Trust Code provisions, and some on neither, including some remaining “honorary trust” provisions.

The law has traditionally regarded pets as “property” and thus not possessing any rights.  In the past, individuals had to do such things as leaving money to a person with instructions to care for their animals, and hope that their wishes would be carried out, since there was no legal way to enforce such a provision.  However, a growing recognition of the importance of companion animals to people has led to several advancements in legislative establishment of means to protect animals left behind.  Call if you have questions!  Our office can help with your pet planning needs (770)416-0776.

 


Monday, February 11, 2013

Helpful News for Trustees and Beneficiaries for Special Needs Trusts

Last fall the Social Security Administration quietly released the text of changes to the Program Operations Manual System -- the POMS. Though described as "clarifications" by Social Security, they were actually far-reaching changes that would have driven up the cost of trust administration, complicated the lives of beneficiaries and provided no additional protection for anyone involved.

Lawyers, trustees and advocates raised objections, and thankfully Social Security listened. Last week another set of changes were announced and the news is entirely good for everyone.

First, a word about POMS. This not very well known set of rules has far-reaching effect. It is a manual of instructions for Social Security eligibility workers, explaining how to treat all manner of documents, transactions and information obtained in the course of eligibility applications and reviews. You can look at the POMS online, but you will quickly see that it is a complicated, detailed and tightly-written set of rules.

The POMS is not law. It is not even a set of regulations governing Social Security eligibility. It has no legal force, and so one might think it is not important. Actually, it is more important than the law, at least in day-to-day decision-making. It is the document Social Security eligibility workers look to when faced with any wrinkle, confusion or question.

The changes last fall addressed several sections of the POMS dealing with how to treat expenditures from special needs trusts. Some of the changes focused on just "self-settled" special needs trusts, others included expenditures by "third-party" special needs trusts and perhaps even payments by family members or others who try to help recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Among the changes posted last fall:

  • When family members paid for items for a trust beneficiary -- like medical supplies, clothing, transportation or pretty much anything else -- reimbursement from a trust would be treated as income to the beneficiary, even though nothing ever went through the beneficiary's hands or account. The same would have been true for trust payments to the family member's credit card.
  • Payments for caregiving could not be made to a family member unless the family member was certified in some way. (This change actually wouldn't have made much difference in Arizona, since a variation of this rule is already in place for Arizona Medicaid -- AHCCCS/ALTCS -- recipients.)
  • Travel expenditures for third persons to visit a trust beneficiary would have been prohibited in pretty much all circumstances.

What changed? Social Security initially removed the change governing travel, and then indicated that the others were under review. Reportedly the high-level reconsideration included senior staff and even out-going Social Security Commissioner Michael J. Astrue (who had already submitted his resignation from that post, to be effective February 13, 2013). Commissioner Astrue wanted the reconsideration completed before the end of his tenure, so Social Security moved very quickly to make changes.

Last week one of the reviews got completed, and the reimbursement policy changed. Not only did it change -- it actually changed to make good sense. Now POMS section SI 01120.200 E.1.d, "Reimbursements to a third party," reads:

"Reimbursements made from the trust to a third party for funds expended on behalf of the trust beneficiary are not income.

"Existing income and resource rules apply to items a trust beneficiary receives from a third party. If a trust beneficiary receives a non-cash item (other than food or shelter), it is in-kind income if the item would not be a partially or totally excluded non-liquid resource if retained into the month after the month of receipt. If a trust beneficiary receives food or shelter, it is income in the form of in-kind support and maintenance (ISM)."

Similar changes have been made in another, related section, SI 01120.201 I.1.f.

What does it mean?

  •  It means that an arrangement used by trustees all over the country, though without any specific authorization, has now been formally blessed by Social Security.
  • It means that the trustees of special needs trusts can reimburse family members who buy clothing, bedding, diapers, supplements, medical devices, transportation services, furniture -- all manner of items -- without risking loss of benefits from Social Security.
  • It means that all of those things can be done without limiting or losing benefits from AHCCCS and ALTCS (Arizona's version of Medicaid). It means that a system that worked well, was responsible and cost-effective, is now available again to trustees, beneficiaries and family members.

Word is that the other changes are in the works for release this week. Here's hoping all the changes will be as thoughtful and responsive to practical realities.


Friday, January 11, 2013

New Scholarships in Georgia allowing Special Needs Children to attend Private schools with better care are changing lives!

http://www.daily-tribune.com/view/full_story/8961920/article-The-Georgia-Special-Needs-Scholarship-Program-is-changing-lives


Wednesday, January 2, 2013

The start to a new life for the Mentally Disabled

   It is a new strategy for Georgia, one of several states responding to mounting pressure from the Justice Department, which in recent years has threatened legal action against states accused of violating the civil rights of thousands of developmentally disabled people by needlessly segregating them in public hospitals, nursing homes and day programs.

   For a family with a loved one who is mentally disabled, one of the hardest decisions they will have to face is determining the proper care for their loved one. Until recently, many mentally disabled persons have been placed in hospitals to live for the rest of their lie. While they are under constant care, there are social elements that are missing when living in a hospitals. These social elements, such as sense of community, friendships, and acitivies like dancing, are essential for personal growth.

  The link below is a story that exemplifies the importance of providing better living options for those who need it most.

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/30/us/ending-segregation-of-the-mentally-disabled.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0


Monday, November 12, 2012

Seniors Beware: How Much Salt are you Eating?

      Just like with most things in life, salt is best in moderation. Salt has been around for thousands of years and has served multiple purposes from being a means to preserve meats to adding flavor to a dish. But did you know that too much salt can create health problems including high blood pressure and heart disease? It is not just the french fries or the potato chips that we have to watch out for, but items that are packadged and heavy card-based.  On National Eating Healthy Day, the American Heart Association developed a list of six items that we should be mindful of consuming because of their above average levels of sodium. Please click the link to find out what are the 'Salty Six'.

 

http://seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Nutrition-Vitamins/2012/20121107-Seniors_Take_Heed.htm


Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Minor Guardianships: Letters of Instruction In Case of the Unimaginable

Writing Instructions to Potential Guardians

 

If you have minor children, or children with disabilities, the thought of leaving them suddenly is unimaginable.  Parents know their children- their schedules, their health, their likes and dislikes- but keep most of that knowledge in their heads.  When my kids were growing up, I knew when they needed to be at soccer practice and church, who their doctor was and how to reach her, and how to tell when they were sick.  Other than abbreviations on my calendar and names in my database, there was no formal written schedule of activities or list of important contacts.

Most parents can’t imagine how someone would be able to step in and take care of their children.  It is difficult to comprehend that someone else would have to figure out your children’s complicated schedule, let alone how to raise your child with the values you want them to have.

One of the ways you can help someone who might have to take over for you is to create a letter of instruction for a potential guardian.  What should go in that letter?  Here are some suggestions:

1.  Healthcare Information

The letter should include a detailed guide to your child’s healthcare, including vaccination records, contact information for their physicians and dentists, information about any allergies or prescriptions.  Note which pharmacy you have used in the past, and any over-the-counter medications your child uses on a regular basis.

2.  Your child’s Preferred Activities and the Important People who help with those activities

Although your children’s schedules will change monthly and yearly, the letter could include information about the activities your child enjoys, contact information for coaches, scout leaders and church youth leaders.  You might include a sample of the weekly, monthly or yearly schedule you and your family currently follow.  If your child goes to a summer camp, include information about deadlines for registering for camp.

3.  How to find Important Papers

The letter should include instructions on where to find the child’s birth certificate and passport, and should include the child’s social security number and a copy of the social security card.

4.  Religious Philosophy

If you practice a religion, include instructions on your religious philosophy along with contact information for the church you attend.  Let the potential guardian know if you would like your child to continue to be involved in the religion you practice, or whether you would like your child to accompany the guardian to their religious activities.

5.  Educational Philosophy

Discuss your thoughts and hopes for your child’s education.  Do you want your child to go to public or private school?  What are your plans for secondary education for your child?

6.  Family Tree and Other Important People

List all of the important people in your child’s life – and include contact information for those people.  If you nominate a person who is not a family member, will they know who your family is and how to reach them?  Let the guardian know if it is important for your child to be able to spend time with grandparents, aunts and uncles, or other important people.   

7.   Things that Comfort

What does your child like to do when he or she is upset, unhappy or frightened?  Do they have a special toy or piece of clothing?  Do you read a certain book to them or play music?  Do they have any pets that they rely on for comfort?

8.  Food Likes and Dislikes

Maybe the guardian won’t want to fix macaroni and cheese every night, but they may wonder why your child won’t eat what they fix for dinner.  Let them know any food preferences – as well as quirky food habits.  Be sure to mention any food allergies your child has and any reactions they’ve had to foods in the past.

Of course, this list is just a suggestion for some basic points you might want to cover.  Remember that the information in the letter will need to be updated on a regular basis as your child grows and changes.  If the letter is never needed, you will have a great written record of your child’s life that you can give them when they are adults and don’t remember that they refused to eat anything but hot dogs and used to love to cuddle with Winnie the Pooh when they were sad!

 

 

 


Monday, October 24, 2011

Naming Guardians for Minor Children

 

 

Phew!  I’ve reached that point in life where I can relax – not much, but a little- because both of my children are adults and, for the most part, out of the nest.  Until just a couple of years ago, I broke out in a sweat every time I had to go out of town on business by myself.  Not only did I worry about whether my kids would get fed, get their homework done and make it to soccer practice on time, but I also worried about what would happen to them if I had an accident and didn’t make it home. 

If you have minor children, children under the age of 18, I’m sure you worry about that, too.  If you are not around, who will feed them, help them with their homework and get them to soccer practice?

Choosing someone to care for your children is difficult.  No one will care for and love your children the way you do, and, as far as I know, we can’t clone you.  However, if you don’t choose someone to raise your children if you’re not there, the probate court will have to make that choice and the court may not choose someone that you would like to raise your children. 

The only way to nominate a guardian in Georgia is in a will.  However, many people put off doing their estate plan because this choice is so difficult.  Here are a few tips for choosing guardians for your children.

First, make a list of everyone you would trust to take care of your children.  When making this list, don’t restrict yourself to the obvious choices.  Remember that if you choose no one, your children could end up in foster care.  If you had the choice of this person or foster care, would you choose this person?  If so, put them on the list. 

Most people limit their list to family members – parents and siblings- but think about your extended family.  Maybe your aunts, cousins, nieces or nephews would be good choices.  Try to think about whether their philosophy about raising children is similar to yours.

Second, would any of these people truly love your children?  Would they raise the children with the religious, social, and moral values that you would like?

Third, look at the personality.  Are they affectionate?  Good role models?

Fourth, be practical.  Would raising children hamper their lifestyle?  If a couple divorced, or one died, would you choose either one of them?

Fifth, look for someone who’s good, not necessarily perfect.  Remember, as we discussed above, you cannot be cloned.

Sixth, talk to everyone you are thinking of naming.  Make sure they are willing to serve, and explain what will be required of them.  Let them know that they should tell you now if they do not want to be nominated as a guardian of your children.

Finally, above all, make sure that you are the one that makes the choice – not the court.

In the next blog post, we’ll talk about writing letters of instruction for guardians.

 

 

 


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The Elrod-Hill Law Firm,LLC assists clients with Estate Planning, Veterans Benefits, Medicaid, Elder Care Law, Probate, Special Needs Planning and Pet Trusts in the North Atlanta area including the counties of Dekalb, Gwinnett and Fulton.



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