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Thursday, June 22, 2017

How Safe is My Mother from Financial Exploitation?


 

Jennifer’s 80-year-old mother seemed to be running low on funds every month.  By the end of the month, she had no money for groceries.  Jennifer had helped her mother with a budget, so she thought her mother had plenty of money to make it through each month.  When she asked her mother to allow her to look at her bank statements, though, Jennifer discovered a series of automatic debits to several companies she did not recognize.  It turns out, her mother had signed up for monthly book delivery clubs, as well as recurring magazine subscriptions for magazines Jennifer knew her mother did not read.
Read more . . .


Thursday, December 3, 2015

Important Things You Need to Know About Medicare Part D

 

This year, a relative of mine had two issues that affected her prescription plan.  First, she was diagnosed with an illness and prescribed new drugs.  Second, she forgot to pay her Medicare Part D premiums and lost her prescription coverage.  How do you choose a Medicare Part D plan?  How do changes in medication affect the Part D insurance plan a participant might choose?  

Medicare Part D is the health insurance that covers prescription medication for outpatient drugs.  Part D is a fairly recent addition to the Medicare Alphabet, having been added in 2006.  This plan seems incredibly confusing, and it can require some research to determine the best plan for each individual.

Medicare Part D is a federally subsidized drug benefit.  The participants will pay a monthly premium to an insurance company that has contracted with the government.  In 2015, the average premium is around $33.15 per month.  After a participant has paid the deductible $320.00, the participant will pay 25% of the cost of the drugs until the total cost of the prescription drugs has reached $2960.  The federal government pays $2,220 of this amount and the participant will pay $760.  

But how to choose a Medicare Part D plan?  Medicare has a pretty powerful program online that can help you make the decision.  Go to www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan.  It will ask you to enter the zip code of the participant, and then will ask for all of the medications the participant is taking, the dosage of the medications, and the number of pills purchased each time.  It will also ask for the pharmacy where the participant usually purchases the drugs.  Once all of that information is entered into the find-a-plan site, the site will spit out a list of plans with comparative information including the cost of premiums, the annual drug deductible, the estimated annual drug costs, and the rating of the plan based on 3 out of 5 stars assigned by Medicare. Medicare sometimes assigns a 5-star rating for a Part D insurance plan that will be indicated by a yellow star with a 5 in the middle next to the Medicare Part D plan.   Once you have entered all of the information, you can compare the costs of the various plans.  Of course, the information is only valid if all of the drugs in the correct dosages are entered into the system.  Be sure to check to see whether the cost of the drugs will go up during the year.  Usually, the cost of the prescription drugs goes down once the deductible is met, and goes up again when the participant hits the donut hole at $2960.

The participant will have to go to a pharmacy in the plan’s network in order to get the lower price you expect to pay. 

Not everyone needs a Medicare Part D plan.  Some retirees may have coverage under their retirement plans, veterans who qualify for free or reduced price medications may not need the coverage. That is called “creditable coverage.”  If you do need it, though, and don’t sign up for it when eligible, you will be charged a penalty when you do finally sign up.  The penalty is at least 1% for every month you delay enrolling past the Initial Enrollment Period.

 

 

 

 


Thursday, November 19, 2015

What You Should Know About Medicare Part B

 

Medicare Part B pays for doctor’s services, whether in their offices, the hospital, your home or other settings, and lab tests, screenings, medical equipment and other supplies. 

You will pay a monthly premium, which may be deducted from your Social Security, Railroad Retirement or Civil Service check.  If the premiums are not deducted from your retirement or disability check, you will be required to pay premiums quarterly.  In 2015, the monthly premium for most recipients was $104.90, though the premiums are higher if your annual income on your individual tax return is over $85,001 or on your joint return it was over $170,001.  The highest premiums in 2015 are $335.70 per month.

Once you pay the premium, there is a deductible and a coinsurance amount that you will pay.  The yearly deductible is $147, and the coinsurance amount is 20% of the Medicare-approved amount that is charged by the providers. 

For example, if you visit a doctor and the doctor accepts assignment from Medicare, the doctor agrees to accept the amount that Medicare has approved for the service.  Medicare pays 80% of the cost and you will pay 20%.  If the doctor accepts Medicare patients, but not an assignment, the doctor can charge you up to 15% more than the Medicare approved amount and you will have to pay the extra amount unless you have a Medigap policy.  If the doctor does not accept Medicare, Medicare will not pay for the service and you will be responsible for the entire amount of the service provided.  Medigap insurance won’t pay for the cost of a doctor who has opted out of Medicare.

Do I have to have Medicare Part B?  You are not required to sign up for Medicare Part B, but you will be responsible for paying privately for the services covered by Part B (unless you have a Medicare Advantage Plan) if you have chosen not to sign up.  If you don’t enroll in Part B when you turn 65 and enroll in Part A, when you do sign up for Part B you may be have to pay a higher premium for Part B.  The premium can go up 10% for each 12-month period that you could have been enrolled in Part B.  If you have insurance through an employer or have a union group health insurance plan that is your own, a spouse’s or a family member’s (if you are disabled), you do not need to sign up for Part B if that insurance will be the primary insurer.  If the plan is not the primary insurer, and Medicare is the primary, you will need to sign up for Part B.

Note that Cobra coverage does not count as employer coverage.

 

 

 

 

 


Thursday, November 12, 2015

UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS OF MEDICARE PART A

 

Medicare Part A is known as hospital insurance.  That term may be misleading, however, because services provided in the hospital by doctors, anesthetists, and surgeons are covered by Medicare Part B.  Part A covers nursing care, such as care provided by professional nurses, a semi-private room, meals, lab tests, prescription drugs, medical appliances and supplies, rehabilitation therapy.  Services provided for home health care, when you qualify, or hospice care are also covered under Part A.

Generally, the Part A premiums are paid for by the Medicare taxes withheld from your paycheck if you or your spouse has worked enough to qualify for 40 or more work credits.  If you have not worked long enough to earn the 40 credits, you may pay up to $407/month based on the number of credits earned during your employment.

You can qualify for Medicare Part A if you are age 65 or if you are disabled and qualified for Social Security Disability Insurance for 24 months. 

Most people assume that Medicare will cover the cost of all health care once you reach 65.  That is not truly accurate.  Although the premiums for Part A may be “free” because you or your spouse paid through the payroll deductions from your paycheck while you were working, in most circumstances you will be required to pay a co-pay or co-insurance.  In addition, you will be required to meet a deductible of $1,260 for each hospital benefit period in 2015.  What is a hospital benefit period?  That is the period from when you are admitted to a hospital and ends when you have been out of the hospital for 60 days in a row.  After the deductible is met, Medicare will pay for the full cost of the hospital care for 60 days.  If you go home from the hospital before the 60 days are up, but are readmitted during that 60 days, the costs of the stay will be covered.  After 60 days and before day 90, you will pay $315 for each day of the benefit period.  After 91 days, you will pay $630 per day.  (These are the 2015 costs.  The 2016 rates will most likely be higher.)

What about admission to a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF)?  Medicare will pay the full cost of Days 1 through 20 in a SNF.  From Day 21 through 100, you must pay a daily co-pay of  $157.00 (These are 2015 costs.)  and from Days 101 on you must pay all of the costs. Before Medicare will pay for your stay in the SNF, however, you must be admitted to the hospital for a 3-day inpatient stay.

You can buy a Medigap policy to cover some of the Part A deductibles and co-pays.  If you are admitted to a SNF, long-term care insurance may cover some of the costs of your care.

Open enrollment for Medicare plans is October 15 through December 7th, 2015.  At that time, you can compare Medicare Advantage (Part C)  plans to regular Medicare plans to determine which option is the best one for you.

 

 

 

 


Thursday, July 23, 2015

Four Ways to Pay for Long-Term Care

Concerned about how your parents will pay for their long-term care?  Here are the four basic ways to pay for care.


Read more . . .


Thursday, July 16, 2015

The Zen of a Family Meeting: The Five Things You Must Cover When Planning for Your Aging Parents’ Care

 

 

July is Sandwich Generation Awareness Month.  The Sandwich Generation refers to those people, mostly in their mid-40’s to late 50’s, who are caring for aging parents as well as caring for young children or dependent young adult children.  If you are the meat or peanut butter in that sandwich, you might be looking for help from your siblings or other family members.  One of the best ways to plan the care for an aging or disabled family member is by holding a family meeting.  The meeting is designed to do many things:  get information from the aging or disabled person about their needs, figure out what kind of care is needed and brainstorm about ways to find that care, gauge the financial resources available for care, and assign duties to various family members so that one caregiver does not get burned out.

Who should attend the meeting?  I recommend that all of the parents and siblings attend a meeting, preferably where they can meet face to face to talk about the issues facing the aging parent now, and those issues that may come up in the future.  If grandchildren, aunts and uncles or friends will be responsible for some of the care, invite them along.    The parent or person with a disability should be in attendance so long as they are physically able to be there. 

It is usually best to hold the meeting in a neutral place, such as a meeting room in a hotel or community center.  I also recommend there be a fairly impartial facilitator to keep the meeting on track, if possible.  And, there should be plenty of snacks and drinks so people won’t want to leave before you’ve discussed all the important points.

With so many families spread out over the world, it can be difficult to get everyone together.  If the family has a regular family reunion, perhaps the reunion time can be extended to allow the family to get together for this meeting.  If there is no regularly scheduled reunion, you can use scheduling programs such as www.doodle.com to find out when the most attendees will be available. If some family members absolutely cannot meet in person, you can use tools such as Skype www.skype.com or Google Hangouts www.google.com/hangouts‎ to bring those other family members in by video.

Once you have set the time and place, have everyone agree to an agenda.  Appoint someone to come up with a proposed agenda in advance of the meeting, and then circulate that proposed agenda for comments, additions and changes.

Here are the five basic items that should be covered in the meeting:

 

  1. The Health and Safety of the aging parent or person with a disability

     

    How do they feel about their own healthcare and safety and what are they concerned about?

    Are there any disease or illness diagnoses?

    Are they paying attention to personal hygiene?

    Have there been any instances where the safety of the parent has been compromised, such as falling, leaving the stove on, wandering, etc.?

    Who are their physicians, dentists, therapists, professional and volunteer caregivers?

    What medications are they taking and are they remembering to take them regularly? 

     

    What health insurance do they have?  If they are on Medicare, is there supplemental insurance or prescription medication coverage?

    How are the premiums paid and is there someone who will be informed if the premiums are not paid?

     

    How are their finances? 

    What financial resources do they have? 

    What are their regular bills and how do those bills get paid?  How will you know if they forget to pay the bills?

     

  2. The current living and care arrangements, whether those arrangements are working, and a plan for future living arrangements

 

 If the parent’s condition is changing, what living and care arrangements will be necessary in the future?

How will you find appropriate housing and care?

 

  1. The legal documents do they have and the legal documents they need

     

    Who is their lawyer and when was the last time they saw a lawyer?  Where are the legal documents stored?

    Who is named as Agent, Personal Representative, etc. in those documents?

    Who are their beneficiaries on their IRA’s, 401(k)’s, life insurance policies and annuities?

     

  2. A plan to pay for long-term care

    Is there long-term insurance available?  If so, what are the terms?  Where is the policy and how are the premiums paid for? 

    If there is no long-term care insurance, can the parent or person with disability afford to pay for care by him or herself?  Are there any government programs, such as Veterans benefits or Medicaid, that can help pay for long-term care?

     

  3. The family caregivers – who will do what and when

Sometimes family members volunteer to perform the tasks for which they have talent.  The brother who is a nurse may be the natural fit for the person to oversee the parent’s healthcare and the sister who is the CPA will take over the finances.  What if it isn’t so clear or if no one wants to take on the tasks?  Can people be hired to perform some of the tasks such as paying the bills? 

Can the family agree that it may not be fair to one of the children to take on all of the responsibility for care?

If one family member is taking on the bulk of the care, can the others agree to take a turn to provide relief to the primary caregiver? 

 

The topics may vary from family to family, and for those families who may find it especially hard to discuss these items you might consider having a professional or a mediator to assist in these discussions.

 

 

 

 


Monday, April 22, 2013

Protecting Seniors from Being Taken Advantage Of

Unfortunately, there have been an increase in reports of senior citizens being taken advantage of. There are various ways seniors are being taken advantage of, but one strikes particular interest with our firm; the deceptive and unfair methods of some Financial Advisors.

Being an Elder Care and Disability Law Firm, we are constantly in contact and working closely with Financial Advisors. They are a vital resource not only for us, but for our clients. We are confident in the Financial Advisors that we work with, but it is a shame that not many out there are honoring their commitment and efforts to help families.

In the link provided below there are a list of 7 guidelines that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau suggest to seniors to follow to avoid choosing a bad financial advisor or product

Click Here

It is important to be aware and alert to suspicious activity. Senior abuse is a crime and will not go untolerated. If you suspect any senior abuse being taken place please contact the Department of Health and Services.

For more resources and information on senior abuse you may also check out this website : http://www.ncea.aoa.gov/


Monday, January 21, 2013

Can A Special Needs Trust Pay for things such as Credit Card Bills or Security Deposits?

   Administering a "special needs" trust can be a challenge. The rules often seem vague, and they occasionally shift. What may seem like a simple question might actually involve layers of complexity. Sometimes expenditures might be permissible under the rules of, say, the Social Security Administration, but not acceptable to AHCCCS, the Arizona Medicaid agency -- or vice versa. Trustees work in an environment of many constantly-moving parts.

Take these two examples:

Example 1:  Being the trustee of a Self-Settled Special Needs Trust for a sister. Can you pay her credit card bills?

Maybe (don't you just love lawyers' answers?). Let's break the question down a little bit.

    First, identify the trust as "self-settled." That means the money once belonged to your sister (it might have been an inheritance, or a personal injury settlement, or her accumulated wealth before she became disabled). That also means the rules are somewhat more restrictive.

We will assume that the bills are for a credit card in her name alone. If the card belongs to someone else, the rules may be different. Not many special needs trust beneficiaries can qualify for a credit card; when they can, it can be a very useful way to get things paid for (as you will soon see).

The next question requires a look at the trust document itself. It might be that it prohibits payments like the one you would like to make. That would be uncommon, but not unheard of. We will assume that the trust does not expressly prohibit paying her credit card bills.

What benefits does your sister receive? Social Security Disability and Medicare: Not a problem.But if it is Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and AHCCCS (Medicaid) there could be a problem.

    Next, we need to know what was charged to the credit card. Was it food or shelter? If it was used for meals at restaurants, or grocery shopping, or for utility bills, you probably do not want to pay the credit card bill from the trust. If you do (and assuming the trust permits it) then you will face a reduction of any SSI she receives, and possible loss of AHCCCS benefits.

Were the credit card bills for clothes, medical supplies, gasoline for her vehicle, even car repairs? There is probably no problem with paying the credit card statement. Even home repairs should be OK in most cases (just not rent, mortgage, utilities, etc. -- and the rules might be different if anyone else lives with your sister).

As you can see, what started out as a simple question turns out to have a lot of complexity. You might want to talk with a lawyer about your sister could use the credit card. When it works, though, it can be quite beneficial.

Example 2: Can a special needs trust pay the security deposit on a new apartment?

What an interesting question. We think the answer is probably "yes."

Once again we need to look at the trust document itself. Was it funded with your own money (like a personal injury settlement), or was the trust set up by a relative or friend with their own money? Is there language prohibiting payment for anything related to your apartment?

Assuming no trust language prohibits the payment, we can turn to the effect such a payment would have on your benefits. Social Security Disability and Medicare? Once again, no problem. SSI and AHCCCS/Medicaid? Your benefits might be reduced, but the payment can probably be made.

The key question is whether a "security deposit" is "rent." Arguably, it is not, rather it is an advance payment for cleaning. A special needs trust, even a self-settled special needs trust ,can pay for cleaning. Social Security's rules treat payment of "rent" as what's called "In-Kind Support and Maintenance (ISM)." This payment, we think, should not be characterized as ISM.

If it is not ISM, then it should have no effect on your SSI or your AHCCCS benefits. If it does, it might simply reduce your SSI payment (by the amount of the deposit, but capped at about $250). So long as you still get SSI it should not have any effect on your AHCCCS benefits.

Are these rules unnecessarily complicated? Yes. Does it sometimes end up costing more in legal fees to figure out what to do than it would to just pay the bills? Yes. Welcome to the complex world of Special Needs Trust Administration. Would it be possible to write simplified rules that allowed limited use of special needs trust funds while saving a bundle on administrative expenses? Yes, but please don't hold your breath while waiting for them.

 


Monday, January 9, 2012

Happy 2012! Make Getting Your Affairs in Order Your Goal for the New Year

 

Each year, I make a list of goals that I want to accomplish for the year.  Some years, the goals have a theme – unfortunately, the theme is almost always the same:  lose weight, exercise more. . .

This year, I’m challenging you to make one of your New Year’s goals to get your estate planning affairs in order.  This is one goal that is easy to accomplish – I promise!

Here are 5 easy steps you can take to accomplish this goal.

1.         Get educated about estate planning.  Attend an estate planning workshop or two.  Estate planning attorneys like me are always giving seminars and workshops to educate people about estate planning.  Yes, these workshops help attorneys attract clients, but the goal of these workshops is really to educate people about the basics of estate planning so clients can have meaningful conversations and can make thoughtful decisions about their own estates. 

2.         Review your old documents.  Do you have a will or trust?  Advanced Directives or Healthcare Powers of Attorney and Living Wills?  Do you have a Durable Financial Power of Attorney?  How old are your documents?  If your wills name guardians for your children who are now 30 years old, your documents are definitely out of date.  Did you name an executor who is now dead or is your ex-wife named as your executor?  Probably time to revise your will. 

            What about your health care documents? If they were done in Georgia before 2007, you may want to update them to the Advance Health Care Directive that went into effect in 2007.  Who have you named to make healthcare decisions for you?  Is that person still the right person to make decisions for you?           

3.         Look at the ownership of all of your accounts.  How is your bank account titled?  Title indicates who owns the account.  Are you the sole owner or is it a joint account?  Who is the joint owner and is this someone who should be a joint owner of your account?  Here’s a link to a blog I wrote last year about the pros and cons of joint ownership of accounts:  http://bit.ly/xm8W5o

4.         Check the beneficiary designations of your accounts.  The beneficiary is the person who would receive the proceeds of the account at your death.  Is the beneficiary your estate?  If so, why did you make your estate the beneficiary?  Having your estate as the beneficiary pretty much ensures that your estate will have to be probated.  Is your beneficiary under the age of 18 or someone with special needs?  It may not be the best thing to give someone under the age of 18 a large inheritance.  Although the court will put protections in place for those under 18, those protections can be expensive and once the beneficiary has their 18th birthday, the money is all theirs – to spend however they wish. Yikes!

             If the beneficiary has special needs, a gift may mean they lose governmental benefits.

            Distributions from IRA’s and 401(k)’s have income tax consequences, so have you considered how your beneficiary designations will affect the tax liability of your beneficiaries?

5.         Make an appointment with an estate planning lawyer, a CPA and your financial advisor.  A good, comprehensive plan involves a group of professionals who can guide  and counsel you in making decisions about your estate. 

Will you accept thechallenge to make getting your New Years Goal getting your affairs in order?

Here's to a great new year!

 


Sunday, December 4, 2011

Medicare: Treat it as Part of Your Financial Plan

 


Medicare changed things up a bit this year by scheduling open enrollment early.  Because Medicare is in the news, I’ve been getting a lot of calls from clients to ask me about Medicare. While most people understand that they can become eligible for Medicare when they turn 65, they wonder about the types of Medicare plans available, and what plan they should choose.  Today, we’ll talk a little bit about the basics of Medicare, and about how to choose a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan.

Here is the basic Medicare alphabet:

Medicare Part A covers hospital insurance that can help pay for inpatient care at hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospice, and home health care.

Medicare Part B covers medically-necessary service such as doctor’s services, outpatient care, home health services, and some other services.  You will pay a premium to be covered by Part B.

Medicare Part C is a Medicare Advantage Plan.

Medicare Part D is the prescription drug coverage.

In order to become eligible for Medicare, you must be age 65, or you must have been receiving Social Security Disability benefits for 24 months.  Most people who are on Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits will automatically get Medicare Part A and B starting on the first day they turn 65, or when they have completed the full 24 months after beginning to receive Social Security Disability.  One exception is that if you have ALS – Lou Gehrig’s disease- you are eligible for Part A and B in the month your disability begins.

Every year, for those who are qualified for Medicare, there is an open enrollment time when you have the ability to sign up for a new Medicare Part C or Part D plan. 

Normally, the open enrollment period begins in January.  However, this year the open enrollment period began on October 15 and ends on December 7.  If you want to know when to enroll in Social Security Part A and Part B, and when to enroll in Part C and Part D here is a handy chart:  http://www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/11219.pdf

Medicare Part D is probably the most confusing of the Medicare Alphabet Programs.  Medicare Part D is the program that offers prescription drug coverage to those who are qualified for Medicare.  In order to get the drug coverage, an eligible person must join a plan.  The plans are run by private insurers or other private companies approved by Medicare.

Medicare Part D is available if you are otherwise-eligible for Medicare A & B.  If you don’t enroll in Part D when you become eligible, you might have to pay a slight penalty when you do join at a later date.  You can enroll in two basic types of plans:  Medicare Prescription Plans or Medicare Advantage Plans.  The Medicare Advantage Plans are usually HMO’s or PPO’s that give you all of your Part A and B coverage, and in addition may give you drug coverage.  If you choose another Part D plan while already enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan that offers a drug plan, you may become disenrolled from your HMO or PPO plan and returned to regular Medicare.

How can you choose the right Medicare Part D plan?  The plans are run by private insurance plans, or private companies, and the cost of the plan is generally based on the prescriptions you use, the “formulary” of the plan, and whether you go to a pharmacy that is within your plan’s network.  The formulary is the list of drugs that a Medicare plan covers.

The Medicare.gov website is full of information about the plans that are available, and is also full of advice on how to choose a plan.  To choose a plan, you can enter your zip code and your prescriptions in the formulary finder on Medicare’s website.  http://plancompare.medicare.gov/pfdn/PlanFinder/DrugSearch.  The plan finder will then give you a list of providers and will tell you the cost of the plan and the cost of the drugs.  You can then call the providers with any questions you might have.

Erica Dumpel, with Czajkowski Dumpel & Associates, Inc. http://cdainc.net/ an experienced healthcare plan advisor, emphasizes that you should research the plans on a yearly basis.  If you have a number of prescriptions, hunting down the right plan can take a lot of time – but can also save you a significant amount of money each year. 

If you miss this year’s open enrollment period, or if you decide not to change plans, be sure to put a reminder on your calendar to review your plan again next year.  In fact, I recommend that you schedule a yearly financial and legal checkup, which should include a thorough review of all of your insurance premiums, co-pays and prescription costs.

Will you start treating your Medicare Plan as part of your Financial Plan?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sunday, July 31, 2011

Caring for Children with Special Needs: Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011

 Caring for Children with Special Needs

Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011

You can’t turn on the television or radio without hearing about the negotiations – or lack of negotiations- in Congress regarding the looming budget crisis.  We are all concerned about whether our elected representatives in Washington can come to a compromise that will help the country out of the current debt crisis.  Of great concern to those of us who work with families who have family members with special needs is whether, and how, the few programs left to support these families will be affected.

Assuming Congress gets through these negotiations and gets back to work on other  important issues, Congress has the opportunity to address a significant issue that the United States faces today.  That issue is that the number of persons diagnosed as being on the Autism spectrum is increasing at an alarming rate.  It is estimated that 1.5 million Americans are currently on the Autism spectrum.  That number is expected to increase by 10-17% annually. 

A growing concern is that the number of autistic children entering adulthood is also increasing rapidly.   By 2023, the number of autistic children entering adulthood is estimated to be 380,000.  The cost of care for these adults is said to be around $27 million, or about the budget of the state of Tennessee. 

On August 3, 2011, the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) is scheduled to meet for hearings on the Reauthorization of the Combating Autism Act, originally passed in 2006.  The Combating Autism Act allocated $950 million dollars over the five year period for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other governmental agencies to conduct research on the autism spectrum.  The Act required the Director of NIH to develop and implement a strategic plan for autism research.  If the Act is not reauthorized by September 30, 2011, the federal commitment will disappear.

The current bill, named the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act (CARA), would allocate the federal funding of $1billion and create a National Institute of Spectrum Disorders Research within the NIH.

If CARA is not passed, research on the spectrum will likely be thrown into disorder.  We cannot afford to let this bill die.  Research into the reasons for the disorders on the spectrum, and especially research into treatment and therapies, is crucial. 

If you would like to find out more about CARA, and how you might be able to help make sure this Act is passed, see http://www.autismvotes.org/site/c.frKNI3PCImE/b.6376831/k.ACFC/CARA.htm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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