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Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Helping Family Members Who Have Disabilities


Last month, we discussed the most important documents you need to prepare yourself for a potential disability that impairs your ability to make financial or healthcare decisions for yourself.  This month we will discuss what to do if you are responsible for making healthcare or financial decisions for someone with a disability.

A few years ago, my father started to show signs that he was suffering from dementia.  He was always a very intelligent man and had good social skills, so the dementia was most likely hidden for a number of  years. 

At some point, he began paying his bills twice or not paying them at all, and he and his girlfriend got lost while driving to familiar places.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, March 17, 2020

THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) AND RESIDENTS OF ASSISTED LIVING AND SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES

As I write this, there have been two cases of COVID-19 identified in the Atlanta, Georgia area.  One of the victims recently returned from a business trip to Milan, Italy, where the outbreak of COVID-19 has reached over 2500 cases.
 
The death toll in the U.S. as of the morning of March 4, 2020, is 9, and the number of identified cases is more than 100.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, December 4, 2019

How to Have A Family Conversation with Aging Parents at the Holiday

Happy Holidays! 

 Is It Time to Have a Conversation About Long-term Care with an Aging Parent?

Like many families, mine is scattered all over the United States.  Work and other commitments make it difficult to visit distant loved ones more than a few times a year.  When visiting, it is hard to gauge the health and safety of family members because they are often not going about their normal daily activities. 
A few years ago, while visiting my dad in Oregon, I noticed that there was something not quite right with him.  He was repeating himself and telling stories about his history that I was pretty sure were not true.

Read more . . .


Monday, November 11, 2019

Podcasts for Caregivers

There are not enough hours in the day – a familiar phrase I mutter to myself while trying to accomplish the items on my ever-expanding to-do list.  That phrase may really be true for those caring for a family member with disabilities. 

Although I haven’t found a way to add hours to my day, I have found ways to extend the time available for learning new things.  I’ve discovered that I can listen to podcasts and books while doing tasks that require my physical -but not necessarily my mental – presence. 

I listen to podcasts when I’m running, doing laundry or cooking, or while I’m wandering around Trader Joe’s picking up groceries.


Read more . . .


Friday, August 17, 2018

What it means to be a healthcare surrogate

When nominated to become a surrogate healthcare decision maker for someone, you may be asked to make decisions about what healthcare procedures and care will be appropriate for someone other than yourself. You will only be asked to make healthcare decisions if the person is not able to make or communicate those decisions.  you may have to decide what medical care the person would want without ever having discussed the issue with them.

In general, as a healthcare surrogate you will have the right to:

  • Make choices about all medical care for the person, to include surgery, medical tests and pain management.

  • Make choices about where the person will receive treatment

  • Take legal action in order to have the person’s wishes honored

  • Apply for insurance, including Medicare and Medicaid for the person


Read more . . .


Monday, June 26, 2017

The Four Most Important Legal Documents You Will Need to Manage Your Aging Parent's Affairs

To help your parents get their affairs in order, you should first make sure that you or someone trustworthy has the legal ability to manage your parent’s affairs.  This article is a guide to the four fundamental legal documents you and your parent may need in order to get financial affairs in order.



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Thursday, June 22, 2017

How Safe is My Mother from Financial Exploitation?


 

Jennifer’s 80-year-old mother seemed to be running low on funds every month.  By the end of the month, she had no money for groceries.  Jennifer had helped her mother with a budget, so she thought her mother had plenty of money to make it through each month.  When she asked her mother to allow her to look at her bank statements, though, Jennifer discovered a series of automatic debits to several companies she did not recognize.  It turns out, her mother had signed up for monthly book delivery clubs, as well as recurring magazine subscriptions for magazines Jennifer knew her mother did not read.
Read more . . .


Thursday, June 1, 2017

Important Things You Should Know Before Deciding to Seek Guardianship or Conservatorship of an Adult


What exactly is a guardian, what is a conservator and when should you become the guardian or conservator of an adult?

Aunt Mary is 86 years old and has always been a little eccentric, but lately she’s been giving money to John, a much younger man that she calls her special friend.  Aunt Mary says that she knows her family doesn’t approve of her giving him money and gifts, but she has plenty of money, John has been her friend for many years, he has always helped her with her home and yard, and she doesn’t have anyone else she would rather spend her money on.  Does she need a guardian or conservator?

What is a guardian and conservator?

A guardian is a person who is legally responsible for someone who is not able to manage his or her own affairs. Guardians and conservators are appointed by the judge of the probate court in the county in which the person in need of a guardian/conservator, called a ward, resides or can be found.

In Georgia, a guardian is the term that is used for the person responsible for managing affairs related to the health and safety of the ward, while a conservator is responsible for the financial affairs of the ward.


Read more . . .


Monday, January 23, 2017

Help, I’m Lost in the Medicare Alphabet Maze!


 

Recently, I had to help a relative reinstate her Medicare Part D insurance coverage after she forgot to pay the premiums for several months.  The insurance company sent many notices advising that they would terminate coverage if the past-due premiums were not paid, but she either ignored the notices or could not comprehend what they said and eventually lost coverage.

After spending hours on the phone first with the insurance company and then with Medicare, I realized that Medicare is somewhat of a mystery to me.  Medicare is not yet my health insurance provider, so other than knowing that most of my clients are covered by Medicare and pay a monthly premium for the health insurance, I really had little idea of how Medicare works.  This blog post is a general guide to Medicare, while the next four posts will explore the alphabet of Medicare in more depth.
Read more . . .


Thursday, July 16, 2015

The Zen of a Family Meeting: The Five Things You Must Cover When Planning for Your Aging Parents’ Care

 

 

July is Sandwich Generation Awareness Month.  The Sandwich Generation refers to those people, mostly in their mid-40’s to late 50’s, who are caring for aging parents as well as caring for young children or dependent young adult children.  If you are the meat or peanut butter in that sandwich, you might be looking for help from your siblings or other family members.  One of the best ways to plan the care for an aging or disabled family member is by holding a family meeting.  The meeting is designed to do many things:  get information from the aging or disabled person about their needs, figure out what kind of care is needed and brainstorm about ways to find that care, gauge the financial resources available for care, and assign duties to various family members so that one caregiver does not get burned out.

Who should attend the meeting?  I recommend that all of the parents and siblings attend a meeting, preferably where they can meet face to face to talk about the issues facing the aging parent now, and those issues that may come up in the future.  If grandchildren, aunts and uncles or friends will be responsible for some of the care, invite them along.    The parent or person with a disability should be in attendance so long as they are physically able to be there. 

It is usually best to hold the meeting in a neutral place, such as a meeting room in a hotel or community center.  I also recommend there be a fairly impartial facilitator to keep the meeting on track, if possible.  And, there should be plenty of snacks and drinks so people won’t want to leave before you’ve discussed all the important points.

With so many families spread out over the world, it can be difficult to get everyone together.  If the family has a regular family reunion, perhaps the reunion time can be extended to allow the family to get together for this meeting.  If there is no regularly scheduled reunion, you can use scheduling programs such as www.doodle.com to find out when the most attendees will be available. If some family members absolutely cannot meet in person, you can use tools such as Skype www.skype.com or Google Hangouts www.google.com/hangouts‎ to bring those other family members in by video.

Once you have set the time and place, have everyone agree to an agenda.  Appoint someone to come up with a proposed agenda in advance of the meeting, and then circulate that proposed agenda for comments, additions and changes.

Here are the five basic items that should be covered in the meeting:

 

  1. The Health and Safety of the aging parent or person with a disability

     

    How do they feel about their own healthcare and safety and what are they concerned about?

    Are there any disease or illness diagnoses?

    Are they paying attention to personal hygiene?

    Have there been any instances where the safety of the parent has been compromised, such as falling, leaving the stove on, wandering, etc.?

    Who are their physicians, dentists, therapists, professional and volunteer caregivers?

    What medications are they taking and are they remembering to take them regularly? 

     

    What health insurance do they have?  If they are on Medicare, is there supplemental insurance or prescription medication coverage?

    How are the premiums paid and is there someone who will be informed if the premiums are not paid?

     

    How are their finances? 

    What financial resources do they have? 

    What are their regular bills and how do those bills get paid?  How will you know if they forget to pay the bills?

     

  2. The current living and care arrangements, whether those arrangements are working, and a plan for future living arrangements

 

 If the parent’s condition is changing, what living and care arrangements will be necessary in the future?

How will you find appropriate housing and care?

 

  1. The legal documents do they have and the legal documents they need

     

    Who is their lawyer and when was the last time they saw a lawyer?  Where are the legal documents stored?

    Who is named as Agent, Personal Representative, etc. in those documents?

    Who are their beneficiaries on their IRA’s, 401(k)’s, life insurance policies and annuities?

     

  2. A plan to pay for long-term care

    Is there long-term insurance available?  If so, what are the terms?  Where is the policy and how are the premiums paid for? 

    If there is no long-term care insurance, can the parent or person with disability afford to pay for care by him or herself?  Are there any government programs, such as Veterans benefits or Medicaid, that can help pay for long-term care?

     

  3. The family caregivers – who will do what and when

Sometimes family members volunteer to perform the tasks for which they have talent.  The brother who is a nurse may be the natural fit for the person to oversee the parent’s healthcare and the sister who is the CPA will take over the finances.  What if it isn’t so clear or if no one wants to take on the tasks?  Can people be hired to perform some of the tasks such as paying the bills? 

Can the family agree that it may not be fair to one of the children to take on all of the responsibility for care?

If one family member is taking on the bulk of the care, can the others agree to take a turn to provide relief to the primary caregiver? 

 

The topics may vary from family to family, and for those families who may find it especially hard to discuss these items you might consider having a professional or a mediator to assist in these discussions.

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Nursing Home Care for Veterans

Nursing Home Care for Veterans

The VA provides “Community Living Centers”, or what used to be called Nursing Homes.  These are operated by the VA, and are usually in a Veterans Administration Hospital.  These Community Living Centers (CLC’s) provide rehabilitation for veterans recovering from injury and illness in the short-term, but also provide long-term skilled nursing care for veterans who need care for long periods of time for a service-connected injury.

For veterans rated at 70% service-connected or higher, or for those who need nursing home care for their service-connected injuries, the VA pays for their nursing home placement as part of their package of healthcare benefits.

The CLC’s are available for non-service connected veterans who are enrolled in VHA healthcare, and need short term services such as rehabilitation, hospice, respite, and for those waiting for placement in the community.

VA provides care to veterans based on a priority system.  There are currently 8 categories of veterans based on service- connection and financial need.  For example, a veteran who is 50% service-connected or higher is in category 1.  A non-service connected veteran with significant assets and income is most likely going to be enrolled in category 8.

Veterans in category 1 will be eligible for placement in a CLC, and will not have a co-pay, but those in category 8 will be placed in a CLC only if there is availability and no one in a higher category needs the bed.  The veteran in category 8 will pay a daily co-pay for services in the CLC.

In Atlanta, the CLC is located in the VA hospital on Clairmont Road, and is almost always full to capacity with a waiting list.  For those veterans for whom nursing home care is not part of the package of medical benefits, they may be able to find placement in one of the two Georgia War Veterans Homes.

The two Georgia War Veterans Homes in Georgia are not run by the national VA, but are available to veterans.  The Georgia Department of Veterans Services and the Georgia Health Sciences University operate the Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home in Augusta.   The Georgia War Veterans Home in Milledgeville is operated by United Veteran Services of Georgia, Inc., which operates the home for the Georgia Department of Veterans Services. 

In order to be eligible for admission to a Georgia War Veterans Home, the person must be domiciled in Georgia, and must have resided in Georgia for the five years immediately preceding admission.  He or she must have been a “war veteran”, defined as any veteran who served on active duty in the Armed Forces of the U.S. during wartime or during the period between January 31, 1955 and May 7, 1975.  In addition, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs must approve them as “eligible for care and treatment”.  Veterans accepted into the Georgia War Veterans Homes will be required to pay some expenses such as Medicare or health-care insurance deductibles and co-pays.  The forms to apply for admission to the Georgia War Veterans Homes are found at veterans.georgia.gov/gwvh-forms.


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